tweed-eyes:

The Walking Library - London, England.


The first Kindle.

tweed-eyes:

The Walking Library - London, England.

The first Kindle.

232 notes

cinephilearchive:

More filmmaking wisdom from Frank Darabont: “The man who is known for spending multiple sessions actually recording his commentary tracks returns with more well prepared information on how he threw away all of his trademark film technique out for a much looser style seen in ‘The Mist.’ Hear it all here.” —filmschoolthrucommentaries: Frank Darabont on filmmaking – Part 3 & 4

In the two previous parts: “The man behind the camera of the classic ‘Shawshank Redemption’ illuminates us noobs on the craft of filmmaking. He talks about such topics as directing, narration, sound design, set design, camera technique amongst other topics. Oh, and did you ever wonder about who Allen Greene was and why Frank Darabont dedicated Shawshank Redemption to him? Listen below and find out.” —Frank Darabont on filmmaking

“If I’m any example, it took me nine years of starving, struggling and honing my craft before I started making my living as a writer. Those were lean years, too, believe me. But in the nine years since then, I haven’t stopped working. I consider myself very lucky, but I also believe you can make your own luck by applying the elbow grease of determination and effort, by nurturing a persistent belief in yourself no matter how bleak your chances seem (this philosophy lurks at the very heart of ‘The Shawshank Redemption,’ and is one of the main reasons I fell in love with King’s story).

My standard joke — actually, I’m fairly serious — is that there are potentially more talented writers and directors than I working in shoe stores and Burger Kings across the nation; the difference is I was willing to put in the nine years of effort and they weren’t. More to the point, it took Thomas Edison a thousand attempts before he got that damn light bulb to turn on. Imagine if he’d gotten discouraged enough to quit after only nine hundred and ninety nine tries. The message here is simple, and John F. Kennedy said it best: “We choose to go to the moon not because it is easy, but because it is hard.” Rough translation? If you have a dream, get up off your ass and start putting one foot in front of the other. Me, I’ll take Kennedy and Edison over Beavis and Butt-head any old day.” —Memo from the Trenches by Frank Darabont
“How bad do you want it? Frank Darabont went through it all, can you? Go and do likewise gents.” —Frank Darabont on a career in film

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:

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cinephilearchive:

More filmmaking wisdom from Frank Darabont: “The man who is known for spending multiple sessions actually recording his commentary tracks returns with more well prepared information on how he threw away all of his trademark film technique out for a much looser style seen in ‘The Mist.’ Hear it all here.” filmschoolthrucommentaries: Frank Darabont on filmmaking – Part 3 & 4

In the two previous parts: “The man behind the camera of the classic ‘Shawshank Redemption’ illuminates us noobs on the craft of filmmaking. He talks about such topics as directing, narration, sound design, set design, camera technique amongst other topics. Oh, and did you ever wonder about who Allen Greene was and why Frank Darabont dedicated Shawshank Redemption to him? Listen below and find out.” Frank Darabont on filmmaking

“If I’m any example, it took me nine years of starving, struggling and honing my craft before I started making my living as a writer. Those were lean years, too, believe me. But in the nine years since then, I haven’t stopped working. I consider myself very lucky, but I also believe you can make your own luck by applying the elbow grease of determination and effort, by nurturing a persistent belief in yourself no matter how bleak your chances seem (this philosophy lurks at the very heart of ‘The Shawshank Redemption,’ and is one of the main reasons I fell in love with King’s story).

My standard joke — actually, I’m fairly serious — is that there are potentially more talented writers and directors than I working in shoe stores and Burger Kings across the nation; the difference is I was willing to put in the nine years of effort and they weren’t. More to the point, it took Thomas Edison a thousand attempts before he got that damn light bulb to turn on. Imagine if he’d gotten discouraged enough to quit after only nine hundred and ninety nine tries. The message here is simple, and John F. Kennedy said it best: “We choose to go to the moon not because it is easy, but because it is hard.” Rough translation? If you have a dream, get up off your ass and start putting one foot in front of the other. Me, I’ll take Kennedy and Edison over Beavis and Butt-head any old day.” Memo from the Trenches by Frank Darabont

“How bad do you want it? Frank Darabont went through it all, can you? Go and do likewise gents.” Frank Darabont on a career in film

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:

74 notes

cinephilearchive:

‘The Long Good Friday’ remains a true (British) classic of the crime film genre, “this movie is one amazing piece of work, not only for the Hoskins performance but also for the energy of the filmmaking, the power of the music, and, oddly enough, for the engaging quality of its sometimes very violent sense of humor.” Roger Ebert

‘Cast and Crew: The Long Good Friday’ brings together John MacKenzie, Barrie Keeffe, Barry Hanson, actor Derek Thompson, casting director Simone Reynolds to discuss the film, its making and its legacy. There are also interviews from Bob Hoskins and Helen Mirren. Watching Keeffe and MacKenzie around a table together, there is still the crackle of creative tension, as writer and director both lay claim to the film’s success. ‘Cast and Crew’: Documentary on the making of the ‘The Long Good Friday’

Written by Barrie Keeffe, a former journalist who made his name writing political drams for TV and theater, ‘Scribes’ (1976), about newspaper workers during a strike, ‘Gimme Shelter’ (1975–7), a powerful trilogy that dealt with deprivation, frustration and anger of working-class youth, and the tremendous BBC drama ‘Waterloo Sunset,’ starring the legendary Queenie Watts. Keeffe wrote ‘The Long Good Friday’ in three days, over an Easter weekend. Originally called ‘The Paddy Factor,’ the story dealt with East End gangster Harold Shand (Bob Hoskins) who plans to go into partnership with the Mafia to redevelop London, only to fall foul of the IRA. The film co-starred Helen Mirren, (who battled to make her character, Victoria, stronger), a young Pierce Brosnan, and Eddie Consantine, as the Mafia don. The script came from all the stories Keeffe heard growing-up and working as a reporter on the Stratford Express, as he told the Arts Desk in 2010. Paul Gallagher, Dangerous Minds

Barrie Keeffe’s screenplay for ‘The Long Good Friday,’ originally called ‘The Paddy Factor.’ (NOTE: For educational purposes only.) As always, thanks to the great folks at Write to Reel.

See also: Flashback — ‘The Long Good Friday.’ The DVD and Blu-ray of the film are available at Amazon and other online retailers.

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:

83 notes

cinephilearchive:

‘The Pervert’s Guide to Cinema’ is a 2006 documentary directed and produced by Sophie Fiennes, scripted and presented by Slavoj Žižek. It explores a number of films from a psychoanalytic theoretical perspective. “‘The Pervert’s Guide to Cinema’ takes the viewer on an exhilarating ride through some of the greatest movies ever made. Serving as presenter and guide is the charismatic Slavoj Žižek, acclaimed philosopher and psychoanalyst. With his engaging and passionate approach to thinking, Žižek delves into the hidden language of cinema, uncovering what movies can tell us about ourselves. Whether he is untangling the famously baffling films of David Lynch, or overturning everything you thought you knew about Hitchcock, Žižek illuminates the screen with his passion, intellect, and unfailing sense of humour. ‘The Pervert’s Guide to Cinema’ cuts its cloth from the very world of the movies it discusses; by shooting at original locations and from replica sets it creates the uncanny illusion that Žižek is speaking from ‘within’ the films themselves. Together the three parts construct a compelling dialectic of ideas.”

Needless to say, it’s a must-have on your shelf. ‘The Pervert’s Guide’ is self-distributed by P Guide Ltd. The DVD of the documentary is available at Amazon and other online retailers.

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:

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cinephilearchive:

The Pervert’s Guide to Cinema’ is a 2006 documentary directed and produced by Sophie Fiennes, scripted and presented by Slavoj Žižek. It explores a number of films from a psychoanalytic theoretical perspective. “‘The Pervert’s Guide to Cinema’ takes the viewer on an exhilarating ride through some of the greatest movies ever made. Serving as presenter and guide is the charismatic Slavoj Žižek, acclaimed philosopher and psychoanalyst. With his engaging and passionate approach to thinking, Žižek delves into the hidden language of cinema, uncovering what movies can tell us about ourselves. Whether he is untangling the famously baffling films of David Lynch, or overturning everything you thought you knew about Hitchcock, Žižek illuminates the screen with his passion, intellect, and unfailing sense of humour. ‘The Pervert’s Guide to Cinema’ cuts its cloth from the very world of the movies it discusses; by shooting at original locations and from replica sets it creates the uncanny illusion that Žižek is speaking from ‘within’ the films themselves. Together the three parts construct a compelling dialectic of ideas.”

Needless to say, it’s a must-have on your shelf. ‘The Pervert’s Guide’ is self-distributed by P Guide Ltd. The DVD of the documentary is available at Amazon and other online retailers.

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:

153 notes

If you love those who love you, what credit is that to you? Even sinners love those who love them. And if you do good to those who are good to you, what credit is that to you? Even sinners do that. And if you lend to those from whom you expect repayment, what credit is that to you? Even sinners lend to sinners, expecting to be repaid in full. But love your enemies, do good to them, and lend to them without expecting to get anything back. Then your reward will be great, and you will be children of the Most High, because he is kind to the ungrateful and wicked. Be merciful, just as your Father is merciful. Do not judge, and you will not be judged. Do not condemn, and you will not be condemned. Forgive, and you will be forgiven. Give, and it will be given to you. A good measure, pressed down, shaken together and running over, will be poured into your lap. For with the measure you use, it will be measured to you.

Luke 6:32-38 

New International Version (NIV)

This is the Jesus I choose to celebrate. Happy Easter.

(via normanbuckley)

20 notes

If you love those who love you, what credit is that to you? Even sinners love those who love them. And if you do good to those who are good to you, what credit is that to you? Even sinners do that. And if you lend to those from whom you expect repayment, what credit is that to you? Even sinners lend to sinners, expecting to be repaid in full. But love your enemies, do good to them, and lend to them without expecting to get anything back. Then your reward will be great, and you will be children of the Most High, because he is kind to the ungrateful and wicked. Be merciful, just as your Father is merciful. Do not judge, and you will not be judged. Do not condemn, and you will not be condemned. Forgive, and you will be forgiven. Give, and it will be given to you. A good measure, pressed down, shaken together and running over, will be poured into your lap. For with the measure you use, it will be measured to you.

Luke 6:32-38 

New International Version (NIV)

This is the Jesus I choose to celebrate. Happy Easter.

(via normanbuckley)

20 notes

quantiflex:

Blackmail - Hitchcock - 1929

quantiflex:

Blackmail - Hitchcock - 1929

2 notes

cinephilearchive:

“Then, last year, while on a YouTube search, I found a fragment of what purported to be a never broadcast BBC interview of Ford from 1968. I recognized it instantly as the interview on which I had worked. The video looked like uncorrected, raw dailies; I could believe it had never been broadcast, although Joseph McBride says he saw a finished version titled ‘My Name is John Ford: I Make Movies.’ Here is the only fragment I have found, about 10 minutes. It has bad color, goes to B/W, jump cuts, and has video breakup from the transfer just at the beginning of the clip. But, yes, it is pure John Ford.” —My Morning with John Ford: Through a Pilsner Glass

So here it is — the full interview. As always, thanks to Larry Wright.

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:

127 notes

cinephilearchive:

Scorsese’s risk takers: legendary director, Martin Scorsese, discusses some of cinema’s greatest risk-takers. Director: Rob Gilbert (Rooster/NY for Fast Company, original air date: November 21, 2011). Thanks to Larry Wright for sharing the Vimeo links.
Chuck Tatum, ‘Ace in the Hole’

Orson Welles, ‘Citizen Kane’

Roberto Rosellini, ‘My Voyage to Italy’

Powell and Pressburger

John Cassavetes

Robert Altman

William Friese-Greene

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:

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cinephilearchive:

Scorsese’s risk takers: legendary director, Martin Scorsese, discusses some of cinema’s greatest risk-takers. Director: Rob Gilbert (Rooster/NY for Fast Company, original air date: November 21, 2011). Thanks to Larry Wright for sharing the Vimeo links.

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:

80 notes